Dawn Baker Speaks at Passport to Excellence Series

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(SAVANNAH, GA) Dawn Baker spoke at Savannah High School (SHS), in the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System (SCCPSS) District’s inaugural Passport to Excellence Lecture Series.

Baker was the second speaker in the SCCPSS Passport to Excellence Lecture Series at her alma mater, Savannah High School, now located at 400 Pennsylvania Avenue. The series is made up of three lectures featuring presentations from accomplished individuals who previously attended or graduated from SCCPSS, sharing their unique career journeys and the insights they have learned about success and how to achieve it.

“I believe as good citizens, all of us should look for opportunities to partner with the schools,” Baker added. “The Passport to Excellence program is unique. I believe it’s the first time the school system is showcasing people as living examples of what the students can become if they get a good education and set their goals high.”

Movie producer Stratton Leopold was the first presenter in the series at Savannah Arts Academy. Baker was the second lecturer in the series, and Howard Morrison will be the final presenter in this 2015-2016 series. Morrison will speak on Thursday, January 21, 2016, at Woodville-Tompkins Technical and Career High School.

The presentations are free and open to the public, but reservations are required to attend. To RSVP, please contact Cynthia Wright at cynthia.wright@carriagetradepr.com. The Passport to Excellence Series is sponsored by JCB North America, Healthy Savannah, 24E, AT&T, Carriage Trade PR and Cecilia Russo Marketing. For more information, visit http://www.passport2excellence.com/

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Howard Morrison, Maya Jackson, David Klugh, Dawn Baker, Kristopher Bonds and Gary Sanchez

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Howard Morrison, Maya Jackson, David Klugh, Dawn Baker, Kristopher Bonds and Gary Sanchez

Dawn Baker poses for photos with Savannah High students

Dawn Baker poses for photos with Savannah High students

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Dawn Baker, speaker Maya Jackson, student at Savannah High David Klugh, emcee Kristopher Bonds, student at Savannah High

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Dawn Baker, speaker Maya Jackson, student at Savannah High David Klugh, emcee Kristopher Bonds, student at Savannah High

MORE INFORMATION ON PASSPORT TO EXCELLENCE:
In partnership with Carriage Trade PR and Cecilia Russo Marketing, the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System (SCCPSS) announces its first-ever “Passport to Excellence Lecture Series.” The inaugural series features presentations from accomplished individuals who previously attended or graduated from SCCPSS. Hear inspirational stories and learn how the foundation of their success began right here in Savannah’s public school system. Dr. Lockamy, the Superintendent of Schools, along other members of the community, will be conducting the public interviews with the speakers. The Passport to Excellence Series is sponsored by JCB North America, Healthy Savannah, 24E, AT&T, Carriage Trade PR and Cecilia Russo Marketing. For more information, visit http://www.passport2excellence.com/

CONTACT
Cynthia Wright
Director of Communications
Carriage Trade PR
Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia.wright@carriagetradepr.com
912.856.9075

Savannah Rotary Presented 1.8K Check from District Chairman

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Gerald Smith (LEFT), the District Rotary Chairman for the Georgia Rotary Student Program (GRSP) recently presented a check for $1,814.50 to the Rotary Club of Savannah, which President Rick Monroe (RIGHT) accepted. Smith said, “The check is thanks for the chapter’s stellar support of GRSP.” The scholarship program pays tuition for international college students. This year the Rotary Club of Savannah is sponsoring Lizzy McGhee from Scotland.

The Rotary Club of Savannah is now comprised of 225 community leaders and volunteers. Over the past 100 years, The Savannah Club has championed local and regional developments including: completing the road to Tybee Island, improving the Savannah River for commercial traffic, enhancing the Dixie Highway system in southeast Georgia, and building bridges over the Savannah and Altamaha Rivers. The Rotary Club of Savannah also sponsored the organization of new Rotary clubs in Augusta, Brunswick, Statesboro, Blackshear, and Savannah West. Furthering the goals of Rotary International, the club has also supported wartime relief efforts, student scholarships, polio eradication and other global health initiatives.

Meetings are held most Mondays from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., at the DeSoto Hilton Hotel, 15 E. Liberty Street. For more information, visit www.savrotary.org

Rotary Club of Savannah
P.O. Box 11105
Savannah, GA 31412
912-272-9711

MEDIA CONTACT
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com912.665.0005

Forsyth Fountain Turns Purple for Domestic Violence Awareness Month on Monday

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Forsyth Fountain Turns Purple for Domestic Violence Awareness Month on Monday
Three Oaks Realty and Bellamy Murphy Art Sponsored SAFE Shelter Awareness Event

WHO: SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services

WHAT: Dyes Forsyth Fountain Purple

WHEN: Monday, October 26

WHERE: Forsyth Fountain

WHY: Three Oaks Realty and Bellamy Murphy Art volunteered to sponsor the 2015 dying of Forsyth fountain in an effort to increase the awareness of domestic violence and its impact on our community.

NOTES: SAFE Shelter displayed the Silent Witness Exhibit at the event. The Exhibit consists of 12 life-sized, red silhouettes, with 11 representing an actual person murdered in an act of domestic violence in Chatham County since 2011, plus one additional figure to represent those uncounted women whose murders went unsolved or were erroneously ruled accidental. Each silhouette also bears a “Plaque for Hearts” chest plate with the story of the person represented.

After the dying of the fountain, the Silent Witness Exhibit is moving to the Tybee Island City Hall building for the final week of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Every October, Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) is observed in events across the country and right here in Savannah to bring to light an issue that effects our community in a staggering way.

Some quick facts:
• Savannah Chatham Metropolitan Police (SCMPD) responded to 3,696 domestic disturbance calls in 2014. In the United States, more than 10 million women and men are physically abused each year.
• In 2014, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services received 1,037 crisis calls.
• In 2014, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence provided services to 695 victims, including 383 children.
• SAFE Shelter is certified by the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council and offers assistance with Temporary Protective Orders (TPO) and Stalking Orders. In 2014, SAFE Shelter helped secure 58 TPOs; providing protective services to 162 victims, including 74 children.

CAPTION: (LEFT TO RIGHT) Lieutenant Robert Gavin, Stephanie Wilson-Evans, Meg Albertson, Jean Ahrens, Linda Huntoon, Sheila Grossman, Cheryl Branch, Mark Howard, of SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services

CAPTION: (LEFT TO RIGHT) Lieutenant Robert Gavin, Stephanie Wilson-Evans, Meg Albertson, Jean Ahrens, Linda Huntoon, Sheila Grossman, Cheryl Branch, Mark Howard, of SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services

MORE INFORMATION ON SAFE SHELTER
Founded in 1979, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services is a 501©(3) nonprofit organization committed to preventing domestic violence, protecting victims and promoting positive change for families in need in our community. SAFE Shelter operates a 48-bed emergency shelter for victims of intimate partner violence and their children. All services are provided at no cost to the victim regardless of race, sex, sexual orientation, immigration status, culture or religion. Leading to safe and stable lives, services include courtroom advocacy, counseling services and case management. In the shelter’s long history, no one who has been actively involved with our services or programs has been killed by his/her abuser. For more information on SAFE Shelter, visit safeshelter.org or call 912.629.0026. To reach the 24-hour crisis line, call 912.629.8888.

CONTACT
Cheryl Branch
Executive Director
SAFE Shelter
912-629-0026
director@safeshelter.org

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
CEO and President
Carriage Trade PR
912-844-9990

Interview with Dawn Baker

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The Savannah-Chatham County Public School System (SCCPSS) District announces that WTOC news anchor Dawn Baker will speak on Thursday, October 29 at Savannah High School, in its inaugural Passport to Excellence Lecture Series. The free lecture series features presentations from accomplished individuals who previously attended or graduated from SCCPSS, sharing their unique career journeys and the insights they have learned about success and how to achieve it.

Dawn Baker

Dawn Baker

Any Savannahian with a television set will recognize Dawn Baker as the bubbly lady who delivers two newscasts each weekday on WTOC TV. She has been at the station for the past 26 years, so there are some who may not even remember a time when Baker wasn’t a fixture in local news.

But what they may not know is that the award-winning news anchor is a native of Riceboro, Ga., and was educated in both the Liberty and Chatham County Public Schools. She was an Honor Graduate of Savannah High School and earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Broadcast Journalism from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

After working for a year in Wilmington, N.C. as a reporter, Baker returned home in 1989 and joined the WTOC team as a reporter. She worked as a general assignment reporter and covered both the education and court beats and now co-anchors The News at 5:30 and THE News at 11:00. Baker will be the second speaker in the Savannah-Chatham County public schools Passport to Excellence Lecture Series on Thursday, October 29, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Savannah High School, located at 400 Pennsylvania Avenue.

A few days ago, she took a little time out to answer questions about her life and career.

Q: Looking back on your public school education, what subjects or aspects best prepared you for your career?

A: Definitely, the subject that best prepared me for my career was English, especially those grammar classes. I actually enjoyed diagramming sentences in the eighth grade and again in high school. I remember being at the old Savannah High School with those sentences going all the way across those three-tiered blackboards. I didn’t realize at the time how much it would improve my writing skills but it really did.

Also, I had a mom who was an English teacher. She was my grammar police all of my life. It was frustrating when I was young. She would say, “If you can not speak properly, do not speak at all.” I learned to appreciate her approach but that was much later on, probably when I was in my mid-30s.

Dawn Baker

Q: How did attending a public school prepare you for life? Did public school offer life lessons that you might not have learned elsewhere?

A: I certainly learned about people from different cultures and backgrounds in school. I moved from the little town of Riceboro, GA when I was in the eighth grade. Savannah High was the largest school in Chatham County with about 2400 students of different races and socioeconomic backgrounds. I learned how different we were but also how similar we were. It taught me tolerance and respect for people who have different viewpoints. I learned how to be tuned into the feelings of others.

Dawn Baker

Q: When did you know you wanted to become a news reporter?

A: My eleventh grade chemistry class at SHS made me realize that I couldn’t be the pediatrician I had wanted to be. I have nightmares about that class. I ended up getting a B minus and I realized if I had to work that hard in science in high school, how was I going to handle it in college.

Another clue was when I volunteered as a candy striper at Memorial Hospital and ended up on the pediatrics floor. I thought it would be so much fun but it was very sad. So many children were born with medical issues. There were some whose parents would not come see about them. I would hold those babies while the doctors gave them shots. It turned out to be the saddest summer. Several of those little patients passed away. It wasn’t what I thought it would be.

Meanwhile, back to when I was in the eleventh grade, the counselors were good about working with kids and helping us with career assessment tests. I knew English was my favorite subject and they told me to look for a career where I could use my writing skills. I only knew of two women – Barbara Walters and Carole Simpson – who were [national] news reporters, but I could envision myself doing what they did. I’m so glad I chose to be a reporter. I get to write every day and meet people every day. Being a reporter, I hit the jackpot.

Dawn Baker

Q: What is your foremost piece of advice for public school students preparing themselves for their careers?

A: I would tell them to adopt an attitude that they’re always going to do their best no matter what they do in life and never allow anyone to place limitations on them. It’s important to take education seriously. No matter what field you go into, education is the foundation for everything you do in life. I would also advise them to never give up, set high goals but be realistic. Always have a backup plan, because life will happen and things may not go the way you expect them to go. Everybody isn’t an “A” student nor can everyone aspire to a grand career, but everyone is important and should do their very best in the job that is right for them.

Dawn Baker

Q: Why did you agree to participate in the Passport to Excellence series?

A: I believe as good citizens, all of us should look for opportunities to partner with the schools. The Passport to Excellence series is unique. I believe it’s the first time the school system is showcasing people who are products of the local school system as living examples of what the students can become if they get a good education and set their goals high. Most schools have career days but they don’t necessarily feature local people. I think that’s extremely powerful. I am also very excited to know that I’m speaking at my alma mater. Many young people may not know that Savannah High School has a long history of being a strong academic school. Many successful people who live around the world were educated there.

Dawn Baker

Q: What would you say to students who aren’t challenged in school?

A: Every school has advanced classes, which are more challenging than sitting in a large class crowded with lots of students. I’d tell them to see about getting into that advanced class. They should also talk with their counselors about early college or duel enrollment while they are in high school, which can give them a head start and decrease the number of years they have to spend in college.

Don’t let a bad place break your spirit and stop you from trying to get the most out of that environment. Bad things happen in life, but that doesn’t mean you should become a marginal person. If you have a bad home environment, do well in school so you can make your life better and help your younger siblings do the same.

We’re all taught from an early age what’s right and what’s wrong. Think seriously about the choices you make. In a split-second, you can make a bad choice that can completely derail your life. If you have an unsupportive family or live in a neighborhood where you don’t feel safe, there are many mentoring programs going on in our city and your counselors and teachers know about them and can connect you with some of them.

Dawn Baker

Q: Can you suggest other opportunities for the local school system or businesses to leverage in encouraging student achievement?

A: When I was at Savannah High in the 1980s, I believe most of the local high schools offered technical training such as carpentry, welding and auto mechanics. Many of those classes are now offered at Woodville-Tompkins, but I think more schools should consider offering these types of classes so that students don’t have to leave their neighborhood schools in order to take going on at school, at church or around your community. Almost everyone has be connected in ways you could never imagine, and always thank people for what they do for you. Say please and thank you. Show them you are appreciative, and they’ll do more to help you.

Dawn Baker

Q: Are you working on any current or future projects you’d like to talk about?

A: I’ve been speaking at universities and churches all over the Coastal Empire and Low Country about my first book that I released in 2011, Dawn’s Daughter: Everything A Woman Needs To Know. The book’s message is how to become successful. All proceeds go towards a scholarship fund for young ladies with chronic/life-threatening illnesses who are graduating from high school. So far, four young ladies each have received $1000 scholarships though the fund. Since 2012, I have awarded $4,500 in scholarships. Even though I never had children of my own, I feel as if I have four daughters now. I am their mentor and friend, and I hope I can bless them the way they have blessed me. For more information about my book, please visit
http://www.dawnsdaughter.com.

I’m also looking forward to the next “Movement in the Park” , a health and wellness fair event, which will be held on May 15, 2016. Each year, on the Sunday after Mother’s Day, I host this fitness expo in Forsyth Park where families can come and participate in Zumba®, yoga, dancing and a good time. Proceeds go toward my scholarship fund.

I started a clothes closet in Hinesville, GA through Bethel AME Church and I am working on a way to get public school students involved in that effort.

I have recently completed everything necessary to organize a nonprofit under the name of Dawn’s Daughter. My plan is also to reach out to families in crisis, offering programs in locations convenient to them, on how to better manage their households and support their children. Next summer, I plan to launch a leadership academy for high school young ladies. The academy will give them the skills they need to become successful leaders in the future.

Dawn Baker

Dawn Baker


Dawn Baker will be the second speaker in the SCCPSS Passport to Excellence Lecture Series on Thursday, October 29, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at her alma mater, Savannah High School, now located at 400 Pennsylvania Avenue.

The presentations are free and open to the public, but reservations are required to attend. To RSVP, please contact Cynthia Wright at cynthia.wright@carriagetradepr.com.

The Passport to Excellence Series is sponsored by JCB North America, Healthy Savannah, 24E, AT&T, Carriage Trade PR and Cecilia Russo Marketing. For more information, visit http://www.passport2excellence.com/

Forsyth Fountain Turns Purple for Domestic Violence Awareness Month on Monday

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Three Oaks Realty and Bellamy Murphy Art Sponsor SAFE Shelter Awareness Event

WHO: SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services

WHAT: Dyes Forsyth Fountain Purple

WHEN: Monday, October 26 at 11 a.m.

WHERE: Forsyth Fountain

WHY: Three Oaks Realty and Bellamy Murphy Art volunteered to sponsor the 2015 dying of Forsyth fountain in an effort to increase the awareness of domestic violence and its impact on our community.

NOTES: SAFE Shelter will also be displaying the Silent Witness Exhibit at the event. The Exhibit consists of 12 life-sized, red silhouettes, with 11 representing an actual person murdered in an act of domestic violence in Chatham County since 2011, plus one additional figure to represent those uncounted women whose murders went unsolved or were erroneously ruled accidental. Each silhouette also bears a “Plaque for Hearts” chest plate with the story of the person represented.

After the dying of the fountain, the Silent Witness Exhibit will be moved to the Tybee Island City Hall building for the final week of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Every October, Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) is observed in events across the country and right here in Savannah to bring to light an issue that effects our community in a staggering way.

Some quick facts:
• Savannah Chatham Metropolitan Police (SCMPD) responded to 3,696 domestic disturbance calls in 2014. In the United States, more than 10 million women and men are physically abused each year.
• In 2014, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services received 1,037 crisis calls.
• In 2014, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence provided services to 695 victims, including 383 children.
• SAFE Shelter is certified by the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council and offers assistance with Temporary Protective Orders (TPO) and Stalking Orders. In 2014, SAFE Shelter helped secure 58 TPOs; providing protective services to 162 victims, including 74 children.

MORE INFORMATION ON SAFE SHELTER
Founded in 1979, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services is a 501©(3) nonprofit organization committed to preventing domestic violence, protecting victims and promoting positive change for families in need in our community. SAFE Shelter operates a 48-bed emergency shelter for victims of intimate partner violence and their children. All services are provided at no cost to the victim regardless of race, sex, sexual orientation, immigration status, culture or religion. Leading to safe and stable lives, services include courtroom advocacy, counseling services and case management. In the shelter’s long history, no one who has been actively involved with our services or programs has been killed by his/her abuser. For more information on SAFE Shelter, visit safeshelter.org or call 912.629.0026. To reach the 24-hour crisis line, call 912.629.8888.

CONTACT
Cheryl Branch
Executive Director
SAFE Shelter
912-629-0026
director@safeshelter.org

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
CEO and President
Carriage Trade PR
912-844-9990

Safe Shelter in Savannah: 10 Truths You May Not Know About Domestic Violence

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10 Truths You May Not Know About Domestic Violence
By Cheryl Branch

Every October, Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) is observed in events across the country and right here in Savannah to bring to light an issue that effects our community in a staggering way. DVAM is an opportunity for SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services of Savannah (SAFE Shelter) to connect with our community through meaningful outreach and awareness raising events.

Domestic violence knows no boundaries. It occurs in every culture and country, affecting individuals from all educational, socioeconomic and religious backgrounds. Victims include the young and the old. While these facts are commonly understood and accepted, the public remains unaware that local help is available at SAFE Shelter and the majority of domestic violence cases are never reported to the police.

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) defines domestic violence as a pattern of behaviors where one person in the relationship uses physical, emotional and other means to maintain control of the victim. Intervention is critical in breaking the cycle of violence.

SAFE Shelter and its Outreach Program provides legal advocacy, Temporary Protective Orders, and support for those victims who don’t require shelter. No fees are charged for any services. Victims often feel no one will believe them; however, SAFE Shelter networks reach out to the District Attorney’s Office, Victim Witness Assistance, and police.

As a community, we are responsible for being that collective voice for those who have no voice.

In an effort to shed light on a this topic, here are ten key facts about domestic violence and SAFE Shelter’s services to those victims in our community that may be helpful to you or someone you know:

1. Savannah Chatham Metropolitan Police (SCMPD) responded to 3,696 domestic disturbance calls in 2014. In the United States, more than 10 million women and men are physically abused each year.

2. In 2014, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services received 1,037 crisis calls. Statistically, one in three women and one in four men have been victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.

3. The economic impact is astounding – victims of domestic violence lose approximately eight million days of paid work each year and many victims lose their jobs due to the stress and illness from this epidemic. SAFE Shelter provides counseling, referrals children’s, advocacy programs and weekly support groups to assist victims of domestic violence and their children.

4. In 2014, SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence provided services to 695 victims, including 383 children. Statistics show that many children exposed to domestic violence will grow up to be abusers themselves and will continue the cycle. SAFE Shelter hopes to break this cycle by offering education and counseling aid to clients.

5. SAFE Shelter is certified by the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council and offers assistance with Temporary Protective Orders (TPO) and Stalking Orders. In 2014, SAFE Shelter helped secure 58 TPOs; providing protective services to 162 victims, including 74 children.

6. Half of all abusive relationships start between the ages of 13-24. SAFE Shelter offers anger management programs for elementary school children and dating violence programs for middle and high school students.

7. SAFE Shelter also offers prevention training programs, including “When domestic violence comes to work,” and “Identifying domestic violence victims in a medical setting.”

8. SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services is open 24-hours a day, 7 days a week, and offers an off-site Outreach Program to assist victims who do not require shelter.

9. SAFE Shelter’s 48-bed shelter is the largest domestic violence shelter outside the greater Atlanta area.

10. No fees are ever charged for any of SAFE Shelter’s services. The crisis line, (912) 629-8888, is answered 24-hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, please know there is help. Recognizing that abuse is present is the first step for any victim and then telling someone he or she trusts. Once the abused has decided enough is enough, finding a safe, secure location is the next crucial step.

If you have real concern about someone close to you, approach the individual in a private setting and refrain from being judgmental. Your care and support may be the key to saving someone’s life or helping the person escape from an abusive relationship.

Domestic violence shelters are available, providing a safe haven for the victim. SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services of Savannah has been helping individuals protect themselves and make a positive change for 35 years. The 24-hour crisis line, 912.629.8888, is always available for those in need, 365 days a year. During its 35 year history, approximately 21,000 victims and their children have come through its doors, and no one actively involved in any of its programs has been killed by their abusive partner.

The location of the shelter remains confidential and basic living necessities are provided. In addition, services such as support groups, courtroom advocacy and protective orders are provided at no cost to a victim of domestic violence.

Keep in mind, domestic violence does not always look the same. Awareness and education are important keys to stopping the cycle.

In the time it took you to read this article, approximately twelve women were beaten in the U.S. Yes, this statistic is shocking. And yes, the effects of domestic violence are far-reaching in our communities. The problem is not going away easily and change happens slowly, one step at a time. For more information on this topic, visit safeshelter.org

Cheryl Branch is the Executive Director at SAFE Shelter Center for Domestic Violence Services . Previously, Cheryl has worked at the Amity House, a domestic violence shelter in Brunswick. She has also served as the Women’s Health Educator for the Glynn County Health Department and a social worker at the Memorial Medical Center. She has helped victims of domestic violence at SAFE Shelter for almost 20 years.

USI Insurance Presents 10.5K to Hospice Savannah

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(SAVANNAH, Ga.) The 2015 Hospice Savannah Golf Tournament, presented by USI Insurance Services, raised $10,500 to benefit the Hospice Savannah’s Daily Impact Fund. Vice President and Senior Client Executive at USI, Daniel R. Sims, Jr., who served as the event chairman, presented the check to the Hospice Savannah Board during their monthly meeting on Thursday, October 22.

“We are so proud to support this program of the Coastal Empire’s oldest not-for-profit hospice providing our community the best services and resources on living with a life limiting illness, dying, death, grief and loss,” said Sims. “It goes beyond therapies, helping honor veterans in their care, keeping pets united with their owners, and even providing a summer camp for grieving children. Our company is grateful be able to help.”

For more information on USI Insurance, visit www.usi.biz.

CAPTION: (LEFT to RIGHT) Bruce Barragan, Hospice Savannah Board chair 2015; Daniel R. Sims, Jr., Vice President and Senior Client Executive at USI; Debra Larson CEO & President at Hospice Savannah, Inc.

CAPTION: (LEFT to RIGHT) Bruce Barragan, Hospice Savannah Board chair 2015; Daniel R. Sims, Jr., Vice President and Senior Client Executive at USI; Debra Larson CEO & President at Hospice Savannah, Inc.

About Hospice Savannah, Inc.
Hospice Savannah, Inc. is the only community-based and not-for-profit hospice in the Coastal Empire and the only hospice to have earned the Gold Seal of Approval® from The Joint Commission. It serves residents of Bryan, Chatham, Effingham, Liberty and Long counties. For more information, visit http://www.hospicesavannah.org/

About USI Insurance Services
USI has more than 4,400 dedicated, experienced and innovative professionals connected across over 140 offices throughout the United States, and is a leader in insurance brokerage and consulting in property-casualty, employee benefits, personal risk services, retirement, program and specialty solutions. With approximately $1.0 billion in annualized revenue, USI is the 8th largest insurance broker of U.S. business 1, the 4th largest privately held commercial lines broker in the United States 2, and the 12th largest insurance brokerage firm in the world 3. USI is also the 3rd largest privately held personal lines broker in the United States2 and the 7th largest benefits broker ranked by global benefits revenue 4. USI has been recognized for its innovation by Information Week 500 and Best’s Review January 2014 Innovation Showcase. Visit the Company’s website at www.usi.biz.

1 Business Insurance 2015 100 Largest Brokers of U.S. Business, July 19, 2015
2 Insurance Journal’s 2013 Top 50 Privately Held Personal Lines (excludes non standard auto brokers-aggregators) and Insurance Journal’s 2014 Privately Held Commercial Lines Leader Ranking
3 Best’s Review’s Leader Issue July 2015, Top Global Insurance Brokers Ranking
4 Business Insurance Largest Benefits Brokers, July 21, 2014

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
Carriage Trade PR, Inc.
912.844.9990
marjorie@carriagetradepr.com