Felder & Associates Welcomes Matthew Luehrmann as Project Associate Prominent Savannah Architecture Firm Expanding Team to Include Ohio Native

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Felder & Associates Welcomes Matthew Luehrmann as Project Associate
Prominent Savannah Architecture Firm Expanding Team to Include Ohio Native

(SAVANNAH, Ga.) Felder & Associates, a distinguished and award-winning architecture firm in Savannah specializing in historic preservation, commercial and high-end residential building projects, is pleased to announce that Matthew Luehrmann has joined the company as a Project Associate. Luehrmann’s chief responsibilities include creating plans for new structures, redesigning existing structures, drafting, site visits and evaluations, maintaining project files, and performing research.

Luehrmann studied at the University of Cincinnati where he earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Sculpture in 2017. He is currently studying architecture on an accelerated path through the Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure at Savannah College of Art and Design, and expects to graduate with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Architecture in 2023 and a Master of Architecture degree in 2026.

Matthew Luehrmann joins Felder and Associates.

“I’m glad to be part of a team that applies the collaborative skill sets of everyone in the company,” said Luehrmann. “Felder & Associates prides itself on elevated attention to detail, which helps us reach the design goals of our clients. I’m looking forward to learning on the job and contributing to this firm as I pursue my degrees.”

Prior to joining Felder & Associates, Luehrmann held internships at Platte Architecture + Design in Cincinnati, Ohio, and A&A Safety Inc. in Amelia, Ohio.

“I’m looking forward to working with Matthew as he grows in his career,” said Brian Felder, Founder and Principal Architect of Felder & Associates. “It’s always a positive experience to have the fresh perspective of a new member on the team. I think he’s a strong addition.”

Luehrmann is originally from Cincinnati and is the co-founder of the SCAD Chapter of NOMAS (National Organization of Minority Architects) and a member of AIAS (American Institute of Architecture Students). In his free time, he enjoys building computers, hiking and cooking.

ABOUT FELDER & ASSOCIATES
Established in 2012, Felder & Associates specializes in historic preservation, commercial architecture, adaptive reuse architecture, corporate interior design, high-end residential design, green building and neo-traditional building. The firm has experienced a 10% yearly growth for the past three consecutive years, and holds memberships with the Historic Savannah Foundation, the American Institutes of Architects and the United States Green Building Council. Recognitions include historic preservation awards from the Historic Savannah Foundation, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation’s Excellence in Rehabilitation award, the Georgia Association of The American Institute of Architects Design Award in Renovation and a special judges’ award from Hospitality Design magazine. Felder & Associates is located at 2514 Abercorn Street, Suite 120, Savannah, GA 31401. For more information or to contact Felder & Associates, call 912-777-3979, or visit http://www.felderassociates.net

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck, Managing Partner of Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com
crussomarketing.com
912-856-9075

CURE Flags for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month Inspires Longtime Supporter During Difficult Time

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(SAVANNAH, Ga.) CURE Childhood Cancer, the only organization providing financial and emotional support to local children and families while raising funds to further critical research specifically for childhood cancer treatments, is launching their CURE Flags campaign to raise funds and awareness for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September. The decorative banners, featuring the gold awareness ribbon and the message “no child fights alone,” can be hung on homes and businesses, mailboxes, lawns, gardens and anywhere it can spread a message of hope.

“We have had a great response during the pre-sale period because our neighborhood captains who are helping to promote them have done such an amazing job,” said Mandy Garola, Vice President of CURE in South Georgia. “Their enthusiasm is inspiring. Our goal is to sell 4,000 flags this year, and I think we’re going to surpass that number.”

CURE Childhood Cancer Garden Flags displayed.

A sign of the overwhelming support in our local area, the number of our flag sales is almost equal to the Atlanta area, which has a much larger population. At one point in the pre-sale period, 1800 flags were sold in 24 hours.  One reason for these accomplishments is Sheri Neidlinger, one of the neighborhood captains driving sales of CURE Flags. She and her husband Richard have been supporters of CURE Childhood Cancer for nearly a decade. Through their family businesses, they have been corporate sponsors of Catie’s Gathering events. Individually, Sheri has hosted tables at the events and worked as a neighborhood captain previously.

In a tragic coincidence, a week before the CURE Flags went on sale, Sheri’s grandson was diagnosed with a childhood cancer. Immediately, she felt the love and support CURE offers patients and families as the boy’s pediatric oncology treatment program began.

“Being in the boat is a whole new perspective,” Neidlinger said. “As I sit here and eat my lunch that CURE delivered, I’m humbled and proud that we have supported an organization that fed, educated, and spoiled my sweet boy all in one day. I never thought that our family would be one of the families that CURE helped. We will now work even harder with them,” she added.

“Sheri Neidlinger and her family have been such wonderful supporters of CURE, and now we’ll be there to support her grandson and her family as they face this,” Garola said. “The fundraising for research is critical, and serving patients and families is another way this organization helps. That’s when the motto on the flag, ‘no child fights alone,’ really comes to life.”

For those who want to support the cause, CURE Flags can be purchased at cureflags.org.

CURE Childhood Cancer is working for a cure by funding research exclusively for childhood cancer and supporting families affected by the disease. Childhood cancers differ from adult cancers in the way they grow and spread, how they are treated, and how they respond to treatment. Every year, more than 17,000 children in the United States are diagnosed with cancer, and incidence rates are increasing every year. Despite cancer being the leading cause of death by disease in children, only six cancer drugs have been developed and approved specifically for children in the last 25 years.

ABOUT CURE CHILDHOOD CANCER

Founded in 1975, CURE Childhood Cancer is dedicated to conquering childhood cancer through funding targeted research while supporting patients and their families. With cancer as the second leading cause of death in children, CURE has dedicated more than $38MM to specific research projects aimed at curing cancers that affect children.CURE is headquartered in Atlanta and has an active staff operating throughout the greater Savannah area. It is the only organization funding pediatric cancer research and providing this level of financial and emotional support to local children and families across Georgia and parts of South Carolina. For more information, visit www.curechildhoodcancer.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Managing Partner, Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com
912.856.9075

Bethesda Academy Receives $10,000 Grant to Study Historic Campus Grounds and History, Linking Past to Present

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Bethesda Academy Receives $10,000 Grant to Study Historic Campus Grounds and History, Linking Past to Present

The General Society of Colonial Wars awards the requested sum to research, dig and maintain documentation on the school’s past.

(SAVANNAH, Ga.) Bethesda Academy, an independent private day school for boys and young men and the oldest child-care institution in the U.S., was awarded a $10,000 grant by the General Society of Colonial Wars for historical research and an archeological dig on the 650-acre Savannah campus.

Featured from left to right: Pearce Reeve, John Reddan, Paul Pressly, PhD.

Founded as an orphanage by evangelist George Whitefield in 1740, Bethesda Academy once boasted the largest building in the colony of Georgia. The actual location of that original building, made of bricks that had to be imported from the Northeast, is currently unknown. The historical significance of the building and its construction extends beyond the campus to the entire colony itself.

“That building saved the colony from bankruptcy because Mr. Whitefield went up and down the East Coast to Philadelphia, Boston, and New York, raising money for the project and keeping so many people working. It had a profound effect on Georgia way back then,” said Paul Pressly, vice-chairman of the board of Bethesda Academy and a board member of the General Society of Colonial Wars.

The board members agree the evolution of this historic institution also connects the present to the past. Bethesda Orphan House has the distinction of being the oldest child caring institution in the country. It was co-ed for a brief period at the start but eventually, in 1900, became the Bethesda Home for Boys, an institute educating and teaching trades to young men. In 1992, Bethesda School began educating students on the 600-acre campus, providing a wide range of learning experiences rooted in George Whitefield’s founding mission. In 2011, the school was officially re-branded as Bethesda Academy, an accredited private school that has since developed into a leadership academy, reflecting the school’s commitment to college preparatory learning.

“Our history isn’t individual segments, but an ongoing story. The school motto, ‘A love of God, a love of learning, and a strong work ethic,’ connects us to our past because that means as much now as it did in 1740,” Pressly added.

Knowing more about the school’s history is important to connect past and future, and telling the school’s story on a national level will help garner wider support. This endeavor won’t be the first time Bethesda Academy strives for a nationwide audience. It happened before, more than a century ago.

John Reddan, Director of Institutional Advancement at Bethesda Academy, explains that in the late 1800s, Col. William Estill, whose family owned the Savannah Morning News, was a board member of the school. He regularly wrote newspaper columns about the school, and the inspiring stories of Bethesda’s challenges and triumphs were occasionally picked up by the national news wire service.

“As a result, Bethesda in Savannah was getting donations from Maine to Chicago and from other big cities around the country,” Reddan said. “A national audience at the turn of the century was unheard of at the time. We would like to get one now, and this donation helps us let people know the difference we make in the lives of people in our care.”

The General Society of Colonial Wars holds conventions in areas with historical significance to the Revolutionary War. The group met in Savannah in February 2022, with representatives touring the Bethesda Academy campus to discuss its role in the Revolutionary War. The history and present of the school and its mission struck a chord with the organization. Five months later, the grant was awarded.

The General Society of Colonial Wars is a 501(c)(3) organization founded in New York in 1892 for the purpose of furthering the interest in and study of America’s Colonial history for the period between the settlement of Jamestown, Va., on May 13, 1607, and the battle of Lexington on April 19, 1775. The Society continues its mission by collecting and preserving manuscripts, rolls, relics and records; erecting memorials; hosting commemorations; and supporting academic research for the purpose of inspiring in the community a respect and reverence for those whose public service made our freedom and unity possible.

ABOUT BETHESDA ACADEMY
Founded in 1740, Bethesda Academy is the oldest child-care institution in the United States. Now it is an independent private day school for young men in grades six through twelve and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The 650-acre campus features a variety of athletic teams, a wildlife management and cattle program and a college preparatory curriculum. Through its “Lead The Way” initiative, students have access to exclusive integrated learning and leadership opportunities. For more information, visit www.bethesdaacademy.org or call 912.644.4376.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Cecilia Russo Marketing, LLC
912-856-9075
cynthia@crussomarketing.com

State Representative Derek Mallow Presents The Outstanding Georgia Business Award To Oliver Maner During The Firm’s 125th Anniversary Year

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Esteemed Savannah law firm earns recognition by the Georgia Secretary of State’s Office for its commitment to community service.

(SAVANNAH, Ga.) Oliver Maner, a leading law firm in Savannah, Ga., was presented the Outstanding Georgia Business Award by State Representative Derek Mallow of Georgia House District 163, which includes downtown Savannah where the firm’s offices are located.

State representatives are permitted to request recognition for a business in their district from the Georgia Secretary of State, along with documentation and verification of facts.

Rep. Mallow proposed Oliver Maner for this recognition after reading an article on LinkedIn about the law firm’s work with a local nonprofit. Rep. Mallow investigated further and found that the attorneys and partners at Oliver Maner supported at least 25 more charities and immediately contacted the Secretary of State’s office to begin the proposal for this honor, which was accepted.

“For their contribution to the community, I’m proud to present the Outstanding Georgia Business Award to Oliver Maner,” Rep. Mallow said. “They donate their time, talents and treasures to help so many organizations. It’s only right we recognize their contributions.”

Oliver Maner Managing Partner Patrick O’Connor accepted the award on the firm’s behalf.

“It’s especially gratifying to receive this award during our 125th anniversary year,” said O’Connor. “Oliver Maner has always supported local charities and doing so is a core value of our firm. We’ve been part of Savannah and the state of Georgia for more than a century, and we look forward to another 125 years of giving back and serving our community.”

ABOUT OLIVER MANER
With a history of 125 years of representing clients in Georgia, South Carolina and throughout the United States, Oliver Maner, LLP, is a full-service law firm capable of handling a broad range of civil litigation and business law expertise. With a team of 27 of the highest-rated trial and transactional lawyers across the state, Oliver Maner possesses the resources and abilities to tackle complex legal problems, including personal injury, estate law, medical and legal malpractice, product liability, civil rights litigation, real estate, transportation and logistics litigation and more. The law firm is proud to have long-standing relationships with its clients, including nonprofit organizations, government agencies, business owners and entrepreneurs. Oliver Maner’s office is located at 218 W. State St., Savannah, GA 31401. For more information, call (912) 236-3311 or visit www.olivermaner.com.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@ceciliarussomarketing.com
912-856-9075

Leadership Southeast Georgia Seeks Nominations For Class of 2023

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The professional development and leadership program empowers participants to address regional challenges and capitalize on common opportunities.

(SOUTHEAST GA) Leadership Southeast Georgia (LSEGA) is seeking nominations for civic, nonprofit, and business leaders across the 10-county Southeast Georgia region to join the 2023 class of its leadership program. The deadline to submit an application is Wednesday, August 31.

LSEGA gathers a diverse cohort of working professionals from Bryan, Bulloch, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh and Screven counties to form lasting relationships as they learn about and engage in constructive examination and debate of critical issues facing the development of the region. One of the goals of the program is to improve the individual leadership competencies of participants, in turn benefiting the community as a whole.

“We look forward to welcoming the next group of ambitious and enthusiastic leaders who feel the need to serve and improve their community,” said Jared Downs, vice president of governmental affairs for the Savannah Area Chamber of Commerce and Visit Savannah and LSEGA Chair of the board of directors. “This community showed its mettle over the last few years, and our commitment is stronger than ever to make Southeast Georgia a better place to live and do business.”

The class spends one weekend a month traveling to surrounding counties to learn about the impact of local issues such as healthcare, education, economic development, and transportation.

Participants develop a deeper knowledge about Southeast Georgia and explore key issues that are common across the region, helping to create an informed perspective on the relationship between individual communities.

The five sessions begin in February of 2023 and will conclude in June. Each two-to three-day session is held in different counties around the coastal region, where matters of infrastructure, industry, business and community development are examined. Sessions include facility tours and panel presentations, as well as personal growth and development exercises for the participants.

“I expect the next class to really dig in and gain a deeper understanding of the challenges unique to our region,” Downs added. “The collaboration we’ve seen is remarkable, and that’s how problems are solved over the long term. We need leaders who can work together and get things done, and that’s what LSEGA is always striving for.”

Candidates may self-nominate or be nominated by LSEGA alumni, their employers, or other community leaders. Nominations may be submitted on the LSEGA website at lsega.com/nominate.

Factors and requirements taken into consideration include:
Must live or work in the county from which he or she applies
Must be willing to serve the community
Must be open to growing as a professional
Must be eager to learn new skills
Must work well and participate in group activities
Must be professional, motivated and prompt
Must have your employers support
Since 1999, the program has produced 18 graduating classes with over 385 alumni. To learn more, visit https://www.lsega.com/.

ABOUT LEADERSHIP SOUTHEAST GEORGIA
Leadership Southeast Georgia is a five-month, region-wide program designed to equip, empower and connect community leaders to most effectively advance positive growth and improve the quality of life in the southeast Georgia region. The executive board and program participants represent a variety of industries across Bryan, Bulloch, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh and Screven counties. From February through June, the class spends two to three days a month traveling to surrounding counties exploring regional issues such as healthcare, education, natural resources, economic development and transportation. For more information, visit lsega.com.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck, Managing Partner of Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com 
crussomarketing.com
912-856-9075

350-Mile Bike Ride to Raise Funds and Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of Paul Anderson Youth Home

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The 17th annual five-day ride in Florida symbolizes the commitment these young men have to their physical, mental, and spiritual growth

(SOUTHEAST GEORGIA/CENTRAL FLORIDA) PAYH, a fully accredited and licensed program offering a second chance to young men in crisis, continues its 60th-anniversary celebration with the 17th Annual Bike Ride. Over the course of five days, July 18-22, five young men from the Home will travel over 350 miles by bicycle on routes along the eastern coastline of central Florida, with a home base in Flagler Beach.

The event commemorates a foundational moment in the history of the Paul Anderson Youth Home. At its founding in 1961, the former Olympic gold-medal winner Paul Anderson hopped on a bicycle and rode from Vidalia, Ga., 1,200 miles to Omaha, Neb. He did this for the same reasons the five boys do it today, to raise funds and awareness of the mission to give troubled young men a second chance through Christ. Now 60 years later, the Paul Anderson Youth Home celebrates more than 1,400 lives changed through a process of recovery, restoration, and redemption.

“This bike ride continues to be one of the Home’s greatest traditions,” said Glenda Anderson Leonard, Co-Founder & President of the Paul Anderson Youth Home. “It is so inspiring to see these young men train, set goals, and then have the satisfaction of reaching them.”

Each rider strives to overcome emotional problems, bad decisions and spiritual challenges. This is symbolized in the physical fortitude to travel such distances. Anderson, a world-class athlete, stressed physical fitness as one component of honoring God. (The endurance needed to achieve these feats honors his lessons of how keeping your body physically fit is as important as exercising the mind, filling it with positivity and prayer.)

“Paul was extremely focused on Jesus Christ, physical fitness, and prioritized it in his life. These young men are honoring his legacy by taking on such a challenging week of cycling long distances,” said Anderson Leonard. “Our hope is that this ride instills self-confidence and Christian character into their everyday lives.”

This year’s goal is to raise $145,500, which will allow PAYH to effectively carry out its mission of helping troubled youth effectively. Supporters can learn more about each rider’s story, how to contribute, or become a part of the PAYH family at payhbikeride.com.

To learn more about the Paul Anderson Youth Home and family resources, visit payh.org.

ABOUT PAUL ANDERSON YOUTH HOME
Founded in 1961 by weightlifting world champion and Olympic gold medalist Paul Anderson and his wife, Glenda, the Paul Anderson Youth Home (PAYH) is a Christian residential program, with an on-campus school for young men between the ages of 16 and 21 struggling in the areas of behavioral problems, and issues of discipline, anger, and depression. PAYH is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). In addition to counseling and character development, PAYH offers an accelerated learning program enabling residents to graduate with a high school diploma and technical certifications. To date, over 1,400 young men have attended the program. The Home is located at 1603 McIntosh St. in Vidalia, GA. To learn more about PAYH, call (912) 537-7237 or visit www.payh.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com
912-856-9075

In Recognition of its 125th Anniversary, Oliver Maner Donates $12,500 to Eugene Gadsden Scholarship Fund 

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Esteemed Savannah law firm makes a substantial gift to scholarship fund for local students

(SAVANNAH, Ga.) Oliver Maner, one of Savannah’s oldest and most prominent law firms, presented $12,500 to the Savannah Bar Association to be allocated toward the Judge Eugene H. Gadsden Scholarship fund.

The Judge Eugene H. Gadsden Memorial Scholarship was established by the Savannah Bar Association to honor the memory and legacy of Judge Gadsden, the first African-American judge in Savannah. Judge Gadsden was well known for his character, integrity and compassion.

Victoria Nease, Wiliam P. Franklin, Jr., Amelia C. Stevens, Paul H. Threlkeld, John Neely, Andrew M. Wilkes, Matthew E. Mills,Joy Nelson, Patrick T. O'Connor
Representatives of Oliver Maner were happy to make a donation to the Judge Eugene H. Gadsden Scholarship fund in honor of their 125th Anniversary. This year’s winner of the scholarship is Savannah Country Day School graduate John Neely. From left, Oliver Maner Associate Victoria Nease, Of Counsel William P. Franklin, Jr., Associate Amelia C. Stevens, Partner Paul H. Threlkeld, scholarship recipient John Neely, Partner Andrew M. Wilkes, Savannah Bar Association Scholarship Committee Chair Matthew E. Mills, Associate Joy Bonner, and Managing Partner Patrick T. O’Connor.

This year marks Oliver Maner‘s 125th anniversary and the donation to the Gadsden Scholarship Fund is intended to celebrate the occasion by investing in the education of law students in the local community.

“Judge Gadsden was and still is an inspiration to the legal community in Savannah and as we celebrate the past 125 years of providing legal services in Savannah and around the Southeast, Oliver Maner is proud to support future leaders in the legal profession as they work toward achieving their educational goals,” said Patrick T. O’Connor, Managing Partner of Oliver Maner. “We hope to continue this legacy onward.”

The scholarship provides funds to a graduating senior from a high school in Savannah to attend an accredited college or university. The award may be used for tuition and fees, books, and other academic expenses. This year’s recipient is John Neely.

Oliver Maner was organized as a firm in 1897 when seasoned military and legal veteran Judge Hansford Dade Duncan Twiggs joined in partnership with recent Vanderbilt University graduate Francis McDonald Oliver in Savannah for the general practice of law. Through the years, various partners have joined the firm, with the current iteration of “Oliver Maner LLP” being established in 2009.

In the past decade, the firm’s partners have tackled some of the most significant cases in the State of Georgia and the Southeast, ranging from one of the only death penalty defense cases the federal courts in Savannah have seen in the past 30 years to defending and prosecuting civil cases involving precedent-setting legal issues and tens of millions of dollars. The firm prides itself on its ongoing involvement in the community, supporting a wide array of nonprofit organizations through sponsorships, donations and service on boards.

ABOUT OLIVER MANER

With a history of 125 years of representing clients in Georgia, South Carolina and throughout the United States, Oliver Maner, LLP, is a full-service law firm capable of handling a broad range of civil litigation and business law expertise. With a team of 27 of the highest-rated trial and transactional lawyers across the state, Oliver Maner possesses the resources and abilities to tackle complex legal problems, including personal injury, estate law, medical and legal malpractice, product liability, civil rights litigation, real estate, transportation and logistics litigation and more. The law firm is proud to have long-standing relationships with its clients, including nonprofit organizations, government agencies, business owners and entrepreneurs. Oliver Maner’s office is located at 218 W. State St., Savannah, GA 31401. For more information, call (912) 236-3311 or visit www.olivermaner.com.

Leadership Southeast Georgia 2022 Programming Concludes with Graduation Ceremony

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The professional development and leadership program focuses on regional health and infrastructure in Chatham County and its surrounding areas.

(CHATHAM COUNTY, Ga.) Leadership Southeast Georgia, a professional development and leadership program held throughout 10 coastal counties, concluded its 2022 programming with a focus on regional health and infrastructure. The participant group consists of regional leaders from business, professional and civic organizations selected to participate in a five-month course of ongoing personal and professional growth to build connections and learn collaboration skills that empower them to improve the region.

Day one of the fifth and final session began in Savannah with a welcome from Savannah Mayor Van Johnson and Chairman of the Chatham County Board of Commissioners Chester Ellis. The group then toured the Waters College of Health Professions building at Georgia Southern University Armstrong Campus before a panel presentation by local stakeholders in public health. The afternoon session included a private tour of Enmarket Arena, and a dinner was held at Trustees Garden with a discussion with Charles Morris about cooking healthy.

A morning presentation from a panel of experts at Georgia Ports Authority opened the second day’s session, as infrastructure took center stage. The class members also toured the port and presented their group capstone projects. After lunch, a boat tour with speakers from local industry, development, and tourism sectors closed out the day.

On Friday morning, the participants completed a final collaboration exercise before the graduation ceremony at Thomas & Hutton. Ellen Bolch, President and CEO of THA Group, delivered a keynote speech to the graduates, who received their plaques and certificates immediately following.

This year’s graduates include Chris Barr, Darrell Boazman, Karen Bogans, Cherise Cartright, Dialo Cartright, Sharri Edenfield, Mandy Edwards, Alisha Erves, Kristin Fulford, Peyton Fuller, Ronnie Hall, Nick Harty, Col. Manuel Ramirez, Jen Roberts, John Robertson, Jason Smith, DJ Spisso, Travis Stegall, Julie Streit, Joe Tallent, Gena Taylor, Jessica Thomas, Sam Tostensen, Nick Westbrook, and Tre Wilkins.

A unique aspect of this year’s program was that some class members from the 2020-2021 program, which was interrupted by the pandemic, joined the Class of 2022 to graduate as well. Members of the Class of 2020-2021 who graduated include Matthew Coleman, Patrick Connell, Kristen Crawley, Hunter Hall, Stephanie Johnson, Maria Whitfield, Petula Gomillion, Ryan Moore, Christopher Smith and Melanie Wilson.

“This is an outstanding group of LSEGA graduates,” said Jared Downs, LSEGA Board Chair. “The relationships we’ve seen develop between participants both professionally and personally over the five months of the program and the knowledge shared from guests will serve these leaders and our community well.”

Other speakers during the final session included Dr. Laurie Adams of GSU Waters College of Health Professionals, Dr. Fran Witt of Effingham County Health System, Dr. Stephen Thacker of Memorial Health Dwaine & Cynthia Willet Children’s Hospital, Armand Turner of Healthy Savannah, Greg Kelly of Savannah Airport Commission, Ryan Chandler of Colonial Oil, Jeb Bush with Forsyth Farmers’ Market, Robert Grant of GSU Parker College of Business, Bryan Buchanan of Ft. Stewart-Hunter Army Airfield, Cristina Pasa Gibson with Coastal Health District, Randy Weitman of Georgia Ports Authority, Carmen Foskey Bergman of Dulany Industries, Jason LaVecchia of US Army Corps of Engineers, Brandt Modlin of Wood., Beth Vantosh with Vantosh Realty and Michael Owens of Tourism Leadership Council.

LSEGA 2022 program sponsors include Evans General ContractorsMorgan Corp.Georgia Southern UniversitySavannah/Hilton Head International AirportM.E. Sack EngineeringGeorgia PowerSack Construction and Maintenance, and Gulfstream Aerospace.The session’s sponsors include Cecilia Russo MarketingColony BankConnell Thaw & RubertiEffingham Health SystemGeorgia CEOGeorgia Ports AuthorityHunterMaclean AttorneysHussey Gay BellSavannah Area ChamberSavannah Economic Development AuthorityThomas & HuttonTQ Constructors Inc.Wood and World Trade Center Savannah.

To learn more about the LSEGA program, visit lsega.com.

ABOUT LEADERSHIP SOUTHEAST GEORGIA

Leadership Southeast Georgia is a five-month, region-wide program designed to equip, empower and connect community leaders to most effectively advance positive growth and improve the quality of life in the southeast Georgia region. The executive board and program participants represent a variety of industries across Bryan, Bulloch, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh and Screven counties. From February through June, the class spends two to three days a month traveling to surrounding counties exploring regional issues such as healthcare, education, natural resources, economic development and transportation. For more information, visit lsega.com.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck, Managing Partner of Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com
crussomarketing.com
912-856-9075

Regional Economic Development Examined in Bryan and Effingham Counties During the Fourth Session of Leadership Southeast Georgia 2022 

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The professional development and leadership program participants focused on the effects of infrastructure, nonprofit organizations and poverty.

(BRYAN COUNTY, Ga.) Leadership Southeast Georgia, a professional development and leadership program throughout 10 coastal counties, continued its 2022 programming in Bryan and Effingham counties. LSEGA is a five-month course of ongoing personal and professional growth to build connections and learn collaboration skills that empower the participants to improve the region. The session four agenda focused on how infrastructure lures organizations to Southeast Georgia, the nonprofit perspective of economic development, and the realities of poverty statistics. Program Managers, Jessica Hood, Vice President, Effingham County Industrial Development Authority and Justin Farquhar, Vice President, Development Authority of Bryan County, developed and lead the session.

“A modern and highly-functional infrastructure is essential to bring businesses to the region,” said LSEGA Board Chair Jared Downs. “Understanding how to achieve and maintain that is vitally important for growth in Southeast Georgia. We learned a lot about how to continue to expand economic opportunity here.”

Class members also reviewed how non-profit organizations see and promote economic development, as well as the effects of poverty in the area. In all LSEGA sessions, participants examine leadership styles and best practices in the organizations they meet with and visit. During this session, there was a specific emphasis on tips and strategies to improve business writing.

The first day began with a trip to Effingham College & Career Academy. Craig Lesser, managing partner at The Pendleton Group, presented an “Overview of Economic Development,” explaining how various authorities work together for the betterment of the region. The LSEGA class then participated in an immersive exercise, examining the site selection factors that impact a company’s decision to locate in the region.

Next, the group briefly toured the Georgia International Trade Center in Rincon before stopping at QuickStart Advanced Manufacturing Center in Pooler. A lunchtime labor panel, “Regional Workforce Outlook and Initiatives,” was held, followed by a tour of QuickStart. Next, a visit to Caesarstone in Midway included a tour and remarks from General Manager Yossi Binyamin on why the business chose to relocate to the region.

Day two began early with a discussion of the I-16 Joint Development Authority and other infrastructure projects of regional significance. This was followed by a business writing workshop and a presentation on non-traditional economic development. Before adjourning, participants received an update on the recent Bryan County tornado from Freddy Howell of Bryan County Emergency Services.

Other speakers during the two-day session included Chance Raehn of Chesterfield, Maria Whitfield of DRT-Pinova, Stacy Watson of Georgia Ports Authority, Brent Stubbs of Savannah Technical College, Susan Williams of Georgia Quick Start, Brian Wiederhold of Pacific Cycle, Justin Farquhar of Development Authority of Bryan County, Brandt Herndon of Effingham County Industrial Development Authority, Ben Taylor of Bryan County, Ralph Forbes of Thomas & Hutton, Amy Condon of The Refinery Writing Studio, Suzanne Kirk of Employee Development Strategies, Erin Phillips of City of Springfield, Kathryn Johnson of Richmond Hill-Bryan County Chamber of Commerce, Christy Sherman of the Richmond Hill Convention and Visitors Bureau and Glenn Newsome of Georgia Hi-Lo Trail.

“It was our pleasure to host Leadership Southeast Georgia in Effingham County,” says Brandt Herndon, CEO of the Effingham County Industrial Development Authority.  “We were happy to work with our partners in Bryan County to showcase the economic opportunities that we have in our communities, and to give a first-hand account on how economic development works at the community level.”

Sponsors for the overall 2022 program include Evans General ContractorsMorgan Corp.Georgia Southern UniversitySavannah/Hilton Head International AirportM.E. Sack EngineeringGeorgia PowerSack Construction and Maintenance, and Gulfstream Aerospace.

Sponsors of this fourth session include Effingham County Industrial Development AuthorityEffingham College & Career AcademyGray Pannell & WoodwardDevelopment Authority of Bryan CountyEffingham County Chamber of CommercePlanters Broadband CooperativeBryan County Board of CommissionersChesterfieldCoastal Electric CooperativeThe Fortune ImageEffingham County Board of CommissionersBroe Real Estate GroupCarlson & Co.C&H Precision Weapons and Carellas Murphy Law.

To learn more about the LSEGA program, visit lsega.com.

ABOUT LEADERSHIP SOUTHEAST GEORGIA
Leadership Southeast Georgia is a five-month, region-wide program designed to equip, empower and connect community leaders to most effectively advance positive growth and improve the quality of life in the southeast Georgia region. The executive board and program participants represent a variety of industries across Bryan, Bulloch, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh and Screven counties. From February through June, the class spends two to three days a month traveling to surrounding counties exploring regional issues such as healthcare, education, natural resources, economic development and transportation. For more information, visit lsega.com.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck, Managing Partner of Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com
crussomarketing.com
912-856-9075

UNITED WAY OF THE COASTAL EMPIRE CELEBRATES THE SUCCESSES OF THE 2021-2022 CAMPAIGN DURING THIS YEAR’S ANNUAL MEETING.

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UNITED WAY OF THE COASTAL EMPIRE CELEBRATES THE SUCCESSES OF THE 2021-2022 CAMPAIGN DURING THIS YEAR’S ANNUAL MEETING.

SAVANNAH, GA (May 17, 2022) – United Way of the Coastal Empire announced today a record-breaking $13.1 million of total funds in and through the organization supporting the community in Fiscal Year 2021-2022 — a figure at the heart of today’s celebratory Annual Meeting. This final number, reported differently than in previous years, fully reflects the work of the organization including the impact of COVID-19 response efforts and legacy giving.

The breakdown reveals strong support from the public and private sectors. Coordinated Government Programs include $3.1 million of Emergency Rental Assistance funds processed through United Way in partnership with Chatham County. These dollars, paid directly to property owners and utility companies, helped keep those most severely impacted by the pandemic safely housed.

The Herschel V. Jenkins Trust, which contributes a percentage annually to the operations of the organization, along with revenue from rental income, in-kind gifts, and administration fees earned through the management of designated funds, totals $1.8 million in sustaining support.

The Community Campaign, a direct result of workplace and individual giving, events, and grants, totaled $8,182,173!

Cecilia Russo Turner (left) Jeff O’Conner (center) Brynne Grant (right)

Cecilia Russo Turner of Cecilia Russo Marketing chaired the year-long fundraising effort. “Donations of nearly $8.2 million are simply amazing, especially as we faced another challenging year due to COVID-19,” Russo Turner said. “I’m so proud of our volunteers, donors, and everyone who helped make this amazing result happen. The resiliency of this community gave life to our theme of ‘No Grit, No Pearl,’ and the generosity of the community has been inspiring.”

In a festive and jam-packed program at the Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort, the organization saluted the generosity of the community, the scope of assistance United Way provides, the value of volunteers and donors who make it all possible, and the dedication of the board members and campaign leaders who keep moving the organization forward.

“The breadth of work accomplished by the United Way staff and community volunteers over this past year is staggering. In addition to the historic core of United Way’s work, including partnering with the most effective and efficient nonprofits in our four counties and direct services like 211, our team processed millions in federal aid, which our local governments entrusted to our oversight,” said Jeff O’Connor, the outgoing UWCE chairman. “And yet, for size and complexity of the organization, our United Way is nimble, too. Six weeks ago, a deadly tornado hit Bryan County, and we were able to immediately mobilize resources to financially support our friends and neighbors.”

CRAIG HARNEY SPIRIT OF PHILANTHROPY AWARDS

The meeting also featured the presentation of the Craig Harney Spirit of Philanthropy Awards, a series of three awards that salute Giving, Advocating, and Volunteering.

The Giving Award went to Michael Solomon, who has a long track record with United Way and most recently created the Business Champions program, in which volunteers, hand-picked by their company’s leadership, significantly increased total giving from assigned accounts.

Stepping forward to receive the Advocacy Award for Chatham County and the City of Savannah were County Commission Chairman Chester Ellis and City of Savannah Mayor Van Johnson. The two organizations have long been great supporters of the organization, running two of the top campaigns every year. But during the pandemic, both have stepped up in heroic ways. In particular, they strengthened their partnerships with United Way to help our community and our neighbors.

The Volunteer Award went to Austin Sullivan, who retired after a long career with General Mills and has since volunteered his considerable talents to UWCE.

CHANGING LEADERSHIP

Taking the gavel as United Way Board Chair in 2022-23 will be Mark Bennett, a long-time volunteer for the organization and Senior Manager of Governmental Relations and Community Investments for Gulfstream Aerospace. He and other nominated Board officers were elected unanimously at the meeting. He introduced Cindy Robinett, Partner, and Client Advisor at Sterling Seacrest Pritchard as the campaign chair for the next year-long campaign.

ABOUT UNITED WAY OF THE COASTAL EMPIRE

The mission of United Way of the Coastal Empire is to improve lives by mobilizing the caring power of our community. United Way is a volunteer-driven organization serving Bryan, Chatham, Effingham, and Liberty counties that involves hundreds of community leaders, professionals, and other volunteers in every aspect of our business including fundraising, marketing, and funding decisions, to ensure that donations are truly making a difference. Thanks to the Herschel V. Jenkins Trust Fund and other income, most of the operating expenses of the organization are covered, allowing more donor contributions to go where they’re most needed in service to the community.  For more information, please visit www.uwce.org.

Contact:
Jaime Dailey-Vergara
Vice President of Marketing
United Way of the Coastal Empire
912.651.7706 (office) | 843.473.9829 (mobile)
Jdailey-vergara@uwce.org